2016 Weekly Photo Challenge: "24. Golden Hour" | Reghan Skerry

Weekly Photo Challenge 2016 | Week #24: ‘Golden Hour’

This is another one of those times when I really should have thought things through a little better when I was putting together the list of prompts. It really would have made more sense to schedule this particular prompt in spring or (better) fall, when there’s still something interesting to take photos of, but the golden hour happens at a more reasonable time.

Sketchbook #13

[FYI: This is kind of long. Feel free to skip it if you’re not interested in reading my stream-of-consciousness artistic angst.]

Ugh. This month.

I mean… it’s not as bad as I probably make it sound. I’ve made real progress in figuring out what’s going on in my NaNoWriMo story: I know who my main character is, and who the antagonist is, and I sorted out the big worldbuilding issue I was having. I’ve started to figure out how the backstory I’ve been thinking about fits into the main story, and I know (generally) what’s driving the plot.

I’ve also been (slowly) building my daily writing practice back into something that I’m happy with, and that will put me on track to be able to hit the word counts I’ll need to make it through NaNoWriMo.

So far, so good.

But.

2016 Weekly Photo Challenge: "22. Balance" | Reghan Skerry

Weekly Photo Challenge 2016 | Week #22: ‘Balance’

Back to struggling with finding inspiration for the prompts that are vague and open to interpretation. For a while, I considered going seriously literal with this one (oh, look, here’s something balanced precariously on its edge), and I considered posting one of the pictures from last month’s photo excursion (which is a better photograph in general, and probably works better for the prompt anyway), but in the end, I decided to stick with the spirit of the challenge.

With luck, I’ll do better next week.

The New York Hat (1912), written by Anita Loos | Inspired

In the early days of film, screenwriting was an almost exclusively female domain, and Anita Loos was one of the most prolific and influential ‘script girls’---the women who wrote scenarios and intertitles for silent films. When she was 24 years old, she sold her first scenario to D.W. Griffith’s Biograph Studios for $25. The New York Hat went on to star Mary Pickford and Lionel Barrymore.